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ANZ backs #LoveSpeech campaign to support LGBTIQ+ community

25 Feb 2020

“Words do hurt”: That’s the message from Australia’s LGBTIQ+ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex, queer and others) community, of whom an overwhelming majority have been subjected to hurtful, homophobic or transphobic language.

A recent survey by ANZ found that 78% have been subjected to such language, while 69% have also been called a name such as ‘dyke’, ‘faggot’, or ‘tranny’.

Despite the widespread use of hurtful language, only 41% of Australians who don’t identify as LGBTIQ+ believe that hurtful, homophobic and transphobic language against the LGBTIQ+ community is a major issue.

Furthermore, half (51%) of Australians who do not identify as LGBTIQ+ believe that the LGBTIQ+ gets offended too easily. However, 40% would ‘make an effort’ to stop using such language if an LGBTIQ+ person called out that language as hurtful.

It is these kinds of statistics that prompted ANZ to create a campaign that aims to raise awareness of the negative impact such language has on the LGBTIQ+ community.

The campaign, called #LoveSpeech, includes a short film that shows the effects of hurtful language and appeals to the audience to stop the hate.

“Diversity, inclusion and respect is a part of who we are at ANZ,” comments ANZ chief finance officer Michelle Jablko. “We hope this campaign helps people understand the impact of hurtful language and promotes more #LoveSpeech online and offline so everyone can embrace their authentic selves.”

Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras CEO Albert Kruger says that ANZ understands that hurtful language affects people.

“That’s why ANZ has launched this powerful and insightful #LoveSpeech campaign, spreading beautiful messages of support for our community. Our longstanding partnership with ANZ started 14 years ago, and their passion for Mardi Gras continues to extend to the broader LGBTIQ+ community and beyond.”

Additional findings from the ANZ survey:

  • 21% of Australian LGBTIQ+ adults say that the first time they were the victim of hurtful language, specifically about their gender or sexual identity, it was from a peer or fellow student at school, and 15% say that the abuse came from a stranger.
  • 40% of Australian LGBTIQ+ adults say the first time they were the victim of hurtful language specifically about their gender or sexual identity took place at high school, followed by 33% out in public (shopping malls, parks, etc.) and 28% online.
  • 34% of non-LGBTIQ+ Australians say that they have witnessed hurtful language towards LGBTIQ+ people on social media, including 46% of those under 24 years old.
  • 44% of non-LGBTIQ+ Australians admit that they have used the phrase ‘that’s so gay’ at some point, of which only 15% say they knew it could be offensive.
  • 66% of the LGBTIQ+ community would not call out homophobic language directed at them.